Week 20 - January 4-8 - Welcome Back!

*Research Literary Theory*


Monday, 1/4

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Independent Reading (10 minutes)


>Share what happened over Christmas break

>Hand back Sem. 1 papers

>Review class Web site

>Review Sem. 2 changes

>Review Sem. 2 focus

>Hand out and discuss Critical Theories of Literary Analysis Research Project


Research Review

Plagiarism Review



Tuesday, 1/5

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Independent Reading (10 minutes)


>What can you see from where you are?

+Take a quarter sheet and, from your seat, SILENTLY write down a description of the object uncovered before you; write in detail what you see from your vantage point.
+Class discussion about our DESCRIPTIONS and our PERSPECTIVE of the object

>What can you see when you look through a special lens?

+Now number off 1 through 5.
+REMAIN SILENT
+Ones, analyze the object now from the lens of a humanist - looking for anything relating to humans, their needs, and their desires.
+Twos, analyze the object now from the lens of an environmentalist - looking for anything relating to nature and our environment.
+Threes, analyze the object now from the lens of an economist - looking for anything relating to goods, materials, production, and wealth
+Fours, analyze the object now from the lens of religion - looking for anything relating to religion, spirits, and powers.
+Fives, analyze the object now form the lens of a mathematician - looking for anything relating to numbers, geometrics, problems, and solutions.
+Class discussion on FINDINGS and PERSPECTIVES.

>Now, apply that same lens to literature:

"Wrist-Wrestling Father"

"Richard Corey"


Wednesday, 1/6

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Independent Reading (10 minutes)



Reminder: Bring note cards; you'll need them Monday.

Perspective continued... it's all in how you look at it.

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//Starry Night// by Vincent //van Gogh//

reader response vs. formalism/new criticism

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Guernica by Pablo Picasso
archetypal vs. new historicism

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Saddam Captured, retrieved from http://www.chandrakantha.com - Music of India

cultural

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"The Problem We All Live With" by Norman Rockwell

Marxist vs. Feminist


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Thursday, 1/7

Friday, 1/8




Week 21 - January 11-15 - Research Literary Theory

Monday 1/11

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Independent Reading (10 minutes)

Reminder: Bring note cards; you'll need them Tuesday.

Understanding Critical Theories of Literary Analysis through different perspectives:

Literary Theory & Criticism

Critical Theory

Review Literary Theory Questions

Choose Literary Theories to Research

Research is like a Road Trip

Research Paper. Geoffrey Sheehy, 2007. Web. 1 Jan. 2010. <Http:sheehy-english.wikispaces.com/Research+Paper. Geoffrey Sheehy, 2007. Web. 01 Jan. 2010.

How to Conduct Quality Research



Reminder: Bring note cards; you'll need them Tuesday.




Tuesday, 1/12


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Write down your understanding of the two literary theories you've chosen to research; then write down the questions and information you know you need to research about these two theories.


Summary Writing


>Paraphrasing

>Central Ideas

>Condensing

>Topic Sentence

>Outline


>Creating and organizing your note cards


Research Workshop



Wednesday, 1/13

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Get out your note cards and research documents; review for organization and understanding.


Research Workshop



Thursday, 1/14

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Get out your note cards and research documents; review for organization and understanding.


Research Workshop

<20 completed note cards DUE TOMORROW>



Friday, 1/15

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Get out your note cards and research documents; review for organization and understanding.


>Bare Bones Outline Review



Outline/Drafting Workshop – send to self via email or flash drive


<20 completed note cards DUE AT END OF CLASS TODAY>


<OUTLINES DUE TUESDAY AT BEGINNING OF CLASS>



Week 22 - January 18-22 - Research Literary Theory

Monday, 1/18 (NO SCHOOL)

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Teacher In-Service Day


<<Students should be working on their outlines and draft at home today.>>



Tuesday, 1/19

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Get out your note cards, research documents, and outline and begin mentally drafting your expository essay.


<OUTLINES DUE TUESDAY AT BEGINNING OF CLASS>

Drafting Workshop


MLA Style Guide


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Wednesday, 1/20

Thursday, 1/21



Friday, 1/22

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Take a quarter sheet and write down for Mrs. Hartwig exactly where you are in the process of your research project - what you have done and what you will be working on this class period.


Please note changes to essay requirements & due dates:


1. No title page required; follow 1st page format per MLA

2. Instead of 2-3 pages, the requirement is now 600-1,000 words

(which is still 2-3 pages of Times New Roman, 12-point, double-spaced text).

3. Rough draft to be printed and handed in at end of class today.

4. Revise Monday with self-revision to be printed and handed to Mr. Mitchell at end of class.

5. Revise Tuesday with peer-revision to be printed and handed to Mr. Mitchell at end of class.

6. MLA Workshop for formatting help will be Wednesday and Thursday.

7. Final paper is due Friday.

8. Each student will orally summarize their research findings for the class on Friday.

!!*PLEASE NOTICE: Mrs. Hartwig expects class and personal behavior to be at its best for Mr. Mitchell. If it is not, the entire class will get the opportunity to prove their knowledge about each of the critical theories being researched through an essay test the following day.*!!


<ROUGH DRAFTS ARE TO BE PRINTED AND HANDED IN BY END OF CLASS (no rough draft, no grade)>


Drafting Workshop


MLA Style Guide


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Works Cited Help


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In-text citation help




Week 23 - January 25-29 - Research Literary Theory


Monday, 1/25 (Mrs. Hartwig gone)

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Take a quarter sheet and write down the specific items you know you need to check for in your first proof-read of your expository essay


Revising/Editing Workshop in Media Center (bring a blank sheet of paper with you)

>Self-Check -that means silently on your own- for organization, diction, fluency, and grammatical correctness (12 minutes)

>Peer Review Musical Chairs (30-35 minutes)

++Put your clean sheet of paper (with your name on it) next to your computer for your peers to write their suggested revisions on.

++Each student will pick a partner to exchange seats with.

++Each partner will read through the other person's essay and write down constructive revision suggestions on the sheet next to the computer (e.g. "2nd paragraph is unclear," "Does this sentence mean...?" "check spelling of the word...").

++When you are done with one partner, find another and repeat the revision process.

++Your goal is to have at least four peers review your work by the end of class.


<Print out your essay from today's self-revision changes and hand in to Mr. Mitchell. (no self-revision, no grade)>



Tuesday, 1/26 (Mrs. Hartwig gone)

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Open your journal to yesterday's peer reviews. Highlight all those comments you know you need to check and correct.


<ALL DRAFT-REVISION-EDIT COPIES DUE TODAY>


Revising/Editing Final Copy Workshop


>Use your peer revision suggestions from yesterday and make necessary revisions and corrections to your research essay, again checking for organization, diction, fluency, and grammatical correctness.


<Print out your essay from today's peer-revision changes and hand in to Mr. Mitchell. (no peer-revision, no grade)>



Wednesday, 1/27 (EARLY OUT)


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Take a quarter sheet and write exactly what items you need to finish and mark with an asterisk those items with which you need teacher assistance. Mrs. Hartwig will visit each of you and assist according to the needs listed on your quarter sheet.


MLA/Final Paper Workshop


Works Cited Help

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In-text citation help



Thursday, 1/28


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Take a quarter sheet and write exactly what items you need to finish and mark with an asterisk those items with which you need teacher assistance. Mrs. Hartwig will visit each of you and assist according to the needs listed on your quarter sheet.

MLA/Final Paper Workshop


<<FINAL Critical Theories of Literary Analysis Research Project DUE FRIDAY>>



Friday, 1/29

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Take out your Final Research Paper and review for summary presentation to class.



<<FINAL DUE AT BEGINNING OF CLASS>>

Class presentations of research findings





Week 24 - February 1-5 - A Tale of Two Cities, by Charles Dickens



Monday, 2/1

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Independent Reading (10 minutes)


Background Information Workshop on A Tale of Two Cities

>Work in the following pairs (one group of 3) to research your assigned background information about Charles Dickens and A Tale of Two Cities.

>Ryan/Shelby W. and Scott/Cari – Charles Dickens’ biographical information

>Shelby C./Tom and Cassidy/Dalton – social environment of the late 18th Century

>Stephanie/Travis and JP/Jordan/Mikayla – political environment of the late 18th Century

>Jared/Alan and Libby/Matt – global environment of the late 18th Century

>Liz/Stuart and Cassie/Harrison -- literature and arts of the late 18th Century

>Some of the information found in each of the following background areas may cross over or duplicate other areas. Also, since there are two groups researching each topic, this will result in some duplication as well, but that’s fine. It’s important to see the connections from different perspectives.

>Your goal is to gather factual information about your assigned topic in order to help build background and context for better understanding and connections with our text. Keep in mind that you will present your information on Wednesday. Therefore, you need to choose a way to present the information, such as a poster or a PowerPoint with the information you feel pertinent.


>Each group will orally share their written/visual information (2-3 minutes max) with the class on Wednesday, 1/27/10.


Tuesday, 2/2

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Independent Reading (10 minutes)


Background Information Workshop Continued


Wednesday, 2/3

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Presentation of A Tale of Two Cities background information


Begin Reading A Tale of Two Cities


Assigned Reading: Book 1, Ch 1-3, Pages 9-22


>Go over Reading Schedule

>ANNOTATING - explanation and reminder



Thursday, 2/4

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TOTC Journal

>>Reading Journals WILL BE GRADED for participation during entire unit.


Read Charles Dickens’s A Tale of Two Cities

Assigned Reading: Book 1, Ch 4, Pages 23-32

Moving from the lens to the language

>Introduction and review of literary terms

>Literary Terms posters

+each student takes one literary term

+defines it (check our Literary Terms posters or our Literary Terms page on our wiki)

+gives an example and/or a layman's (simplified) definition

+draws a visual representation that will help us remember the meaning



Friday, 2/5 (Mrs. Hartwig Gone)

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TOTC Journal

Continue Reading A Tale of Two Cities

Assigned Weekend Reading: Book 1, Ch 5-6, Pages 33-51

Moving from the lens to the language

>Literary Terms poster Passing Game

(yesterday's posters should be displayed on each desk)

+Make a list of all the terms from yesterday

+move from desk to desk and copy definitions

+first three done with all terms may visit the treat box


>When done with poster passing game, enjoy the extra SILENT reading and annotating time.

Book 1 "Recalled to Life" Quiz on MONDAY*




Week 25 - February 8-15 - A Tale of Two Cities, by Charles Dickens



Monday, 2/8 (2-hour late start)

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TOTC Journal

Continue Reading A Tale of Two Cities

Assigned Reading: Book 2, Ch 1-2, Pages 53-64

>Research essays have been graded and are on parent/student portal

>Book 1 Review - with a partner, write a one-page summary (to be turned in by end of class) summarizing each chapter in "Book the First." You may use your books and annotations to complete this assignment.

>This will be in lieu of the *Book 1 "Recalled to Life" Quiz* originally planned unless class behavior in Mrs. Hartwig's absence is poor.


Tuesday, 2/9

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TOTC Journal

Continue Reading A Tale of Two Cities

Assigned Reading: Book 2, Ch 3-4, Pages 65-82

A Tale of Two Cities Review


Wednesday, 2/10 (Early Out for P/T Conferences)

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TOTC Journal


Reminder: Your A Tale of Two Cities Journals will be graded each week for participation


Continue Reading A Tale of Two Cities

Assigned Reading: Book 2, Ch 5-6, Pages 83-98

A Tale of Two Cities Review

Literary Terms Review

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This is a depiction of the "mysterious giant who had a golden arm starting out of the wall of the front hall" (Dickens 90) in the description of the building in which Dr. Manette lived, wherein there were businesses like goldsmiths and silversmiths located.






Thursday, 2/11 (Early Out for P/T Conferences)

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TOTC Journal


Continue Reading A Tale of Two Cities

Assigned Reading: Book 2, Ch 7-8, Pages 99-111

<LITERARY TERMS TEST>



Friday, 2/12 (NO SCHOOL - but please note you STILL HAVE AN ASSIGNMENT!)

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TOTC Journal


Continue Reading A Tale of Two Cities

Assigned Weekend Reading: Book 2, Ch 9-11, Pages 113-134





Week 26 - February 15-19 - A Tale of Two Cities, by Charles Dickens



Monday, 2/15 (SNOW DAY)

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TOTC Journal


REMINDER: 1st annotation is due TODAY

Continue Reading A Tale of Two Cities

Assigned Reading: Book 2, Ch 12-13, Pages 135-144



Tuesday, 2/16 (2-hour late start)

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TOTC Journal

REMINDER: Because of yesterday's snow day, I have given a one-day extension on annotations, so your 1st annotation is due TODAY, 2/16/10.

Continue Reading A Tale of Two Cities

Assigned Reading: Book 2, Ch 14-15, Pages 145-163

A Tale of Two Cities Review



Wednesday, 2/17

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TOTC Journal

>>REMINDER: Reading Journals ARE GRADED for participation during entire unit.

Continue Reading A Tale of Two Cities

Assigned Reading: Book 2, Ch 16-17, Pages 165-179

Continue A Tale of Two Cities Review



Thursday, 2/18

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TOTC Journal


Continue Reading A Tale of Two Cities

Assigned Reading: Book 2, Ch 18-20, Pages 181-196

Introduction to Archetypes

>What is an archetype?

>What do archetypes have to do with history and literature?

>Archetypal Bingo

>What archetypes have you seen in A Tale of Two Cities so far?

<Assignment: Make a list of all the archetypes you find/have found in our text so far. The person with the most will earn a prize. Archetypal List Due TOMORROW>


*Book 2 Quiz tomorrow*



Friday, 2/19

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TOTC Journal

>>Journals will be graded on Monday


Continue Reading A Tale of Two Cities

Assigned Weekend Reading: Book 2, Ch 21-23, Pages 197-218

*Book 2 Quiz*

Applying the Archetypal Lens

>discuss archetypes from yesterday's activity

Hand out prize for archetype winners





Week 27 - February 22-26 - A Tale of Two Cities, by Charles Dickens



Monday, 2/22 (2-hour late start)

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TOTC Journal

>>Journals will be graded today, so leave your journal with Mrs. Hartwig today.


Continue Reading A Tale of Two Cities

Assigned Reading: Book 2, Ch 24, Pages 219-228

A Tale of Two Cities Review




Tuesday, 2/23

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TOTC Journal

Continue Reading A Tale of Two Cities

Assigned Reading: Book 3, Ch 1-2, Pages 229-244

Looking at Figurative Language through the New Criticism lens

In pairs, begin reading A Tale of Two Cities and complete the following:

>Figurative Language handout - search and record figurative language in A Tale of Two Cities

>As you read, use your stickie notes to annotate your text:

++identify figurative language

++label trouble spots

++ask questions

++make connections


Wednesday, 2/24 (EARLY OUT)

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TOTC Journal


Continue Reading A Tale of Two Cities

Assigned Reading: Book 3, Ch 3-5, Pages 245-261

Looking at Figurative Language through the New Criticism lens

>Discuss your Figurative Language handout and the following:

++figurative language

++trouble spots

++questions

++connections



Thursday, 2/25

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TOTC Journal



Continue Reading A Tale of Two Cities

Assigned Reading: Book 3

Ch 6-7, Pages 263-273

Critical Analysis Dice Debate

Psychoanalytic

New Historicism

Cultural

Feminist

Marxism

New Criticism

Reader Response

Archetypal

Eco-criticism


Friday, 2/26

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TOTC Journal


Continue Reading A Tale of Two Cities

Assigned Weekend Reading: Book 3, Ch 8-9, Pages 275-294

< A Tale of Two Cities FINAL EVALUATION ASSIGNMENT: You will prepare a character analysis essay from the perspective of one of the characters in the text. You choose which character you would like to be. Then analyze one of the other characters in the story from that perspective. More details will follow.>

A Literary Debate:

New Criticism vs. Marxism




Week 28 - March 1-5 - A Tale of Two Cities, by Charles Dickens



Monday, 3/1

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TOTC Journal


Continue Reading A Tale of Two Cities

Assigned Reading: Book 3, Ch 10, Pages 295-306

< A Tale of Two Cities FINAL EVALUATION ASSIGNMENT: You will prepare a character analysis essay from the perspective of one of the characters in the text. You choose which character you would like to be. Then analyze one of the other characters in the story from that perspective. More details will follow.>

Continue our Literary Debate:

New Criticism vs. Marxism



Tuesday, 3/2

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TOTC Journal


Continue Reading A Tale of Two Cities

Assigned Reading: Book 3, Ch 11-13, Pages 307-328

A Tale of Two Cities Review

Student-Made Timeline

>Begin watching movie A Tale of Two Cities



Wednesday, 3/3

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TOTC Journal


Continue Reading A Tale of Two Cities

Assigned Reading: Book 3, Ch 14-15, Pages 329-343

*Book 3 Quiz tomorrow*

< A Tale of Two Cities FINAL EVALUATION ASSIGNMENT DUE NEXT THURSDAY: You will prepare a character analysis essay from the perspective of one of the characters in the text. You choose which character you would like to be. Then analyze one of the other characters in the story from that perspective. Must include all required elements (see PowerPoint).>


>Begin watching movie A Tale of Two Cities




Thursday, 3/4

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TOTC Journal


Continue Reading A Tale of Two Cities

*Book 3 Quiz*

>Begin watching movie A Tale of Two Cities



Friday, 3/5


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TOTC Journal

Continue Reading A Tale of Two Cities

Review for Final test




Week 29 - March 8-12 - Culture/Background & Voice/Word Choice



Monday, 3/8

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>Watch movie A Tale of Two Cities



Tuesday, 3/9

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>Watch movie A Tale of Two Cities



Wednesday, 3/10 (EARLY OUT)

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>Watch movie of A Tale of Two Cities

Thursday, 3/11

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Character Analysis Workshop and review for final test

Character Analysis due at end of class



Friday, 3/12

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Final test on A Tale of Two Cities

>Watch movie of A Tale of Two Cities





Week 30 - March 15-19 - I-Have-A-Plan-Iowa & SPRING BREAK

Monday, 3/15

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I Have a Plan Iowa



Tuesday, 3/16

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I Have a Plan Iowa


Wednesday, 3/17

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Independent Reading

>To Kill a Mockingbird Introduction

>What do we think today?

My idea of a hero is...
America's idea of a model family may be described as...
A defendant in a jury trial has the best chance of being found innocent if...
One advantage of living before 1950 was...
One disadvantage of living before 1950 was...
A Southern lady would never...
Adults treat children of today...


Thursday, 3/18 SPRING BREAK!!

Friday, 3/19 SPRING BREAK!!



Week 31 - March 23-26 - Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird


Monday, 3/22 SPRING BREAK!!


Tuesday, 3/23

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Please take a book, a Reading Connection sheet, and a Webquest Answer Sheet


>To Kill a Mockingbird, Chapter 1

>Chapter 1 VOCABULARY


>Move to the media center desktops to begin To Kill a Mockingbird webquest




Wednesday, 3/24 (early out)

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Please take a book and a Webquest Answer Sheet


>Chapters 2-3 VOCABULARY

>Move to the media center desktops to complete To Kill a Mockingbird webquest




Thursday, 3/25

bell.jpgJ: Ch. 4-5 - What memories of your own childhood come to mind as you read about Scout’s experiences?

>Chapters 4-5 VOCABULARY

>Then & Now Connection: class issues

>A look through the cultural lens:

+What do we learn about the culture of Maycomb in the 1930s?

+Has To Kill a Mockingbird helped to shape the culture of America? If so, in what ways?



Friday, 3/26

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Reading Quiz through chapter 7


>Chapters 6-7 VOCABULARY

>Issues & Opinions: Where do you stand?



Week 32 - March 29-April 6 - Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird


Monday, 3/29

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Reading Quiz Chapters 8-9


>Chapters 8-9 VOCABULARY

>Then & Now Connection: racial issues

>A look through the new historical lens:

+Why did Atticus say, "Simply because we were licked a hundred years before we started is no reason for us not to try to win"?

+Does Harper Lee's work promote or undermine the prevailing power structures of the time and place in which it was written/published?



Tuesday, 3/30

bell.jpgJ: Ch 10-11 - What connection might there be between what is required of Atticus to shoot the mad dog and what is required of him to defend Tom Robinson?

>Chapters 10-11 VOCABULARY

Then & Now Connection: character issues

>A look at characters:

+Who are our characters?

+Think of 2-3 personal qualities of each character shown by their words and actions.

>A look at characterization:

+What makes a person good? Bad? Strong? Weak? Mean? Nice? Hero? Villain? Popular? Outcast?

+Which characters fit each characteristic?

+What life lessons do Atticus and Calpurnia teach Scout and Jem?

+Are any of these lessons you've learned from your family and elders?

>Begin watching To Kill a Mockingbird Film Classic



Wednesday, 3/31

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langston_hughes.JPGReading Quiz Chapters 12-13


>Chapters 12-13 VOCABULARY

>Then & Now Connection: racial issues

>Another look through the cultural lens:

+Langston Hughes's "Freedom's Plow"


Langston Hughes image found at
<http://drake.marin.k12.ca.us/stuwork/comacad/poets/HUGHES/CONTEXT.HTM>

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Mahalia Jackson image found at
http://whenevawhateva.files.wordpress.com/2009/06/mahalia-jackson.jpg


+What connections can you make between Langston's Hughes's "Freedom's Plow" written in 1943 and and Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird published in 1960?

+What can the works teach us about specifics of African-American heritage, culture, and experience?



Thursday, 4/1

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J: Ch. 14 & 15 - In your reading for today, Scout unwittingly prevents the Old Sarum mob from taking and lynching Tom Robinson. What is your understanding of what lynching was all about? Further, what was your emotional reaction to lynching the first time you heard of it or saw a picture of a lynching? (Keep your journals for later reflection.)


>Chapters 14-15 VOCABULARY

Lynching Statistics

"Strange Fruit"

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Billie Holiday Image found at <content.answers.com/main/content/img/amg/pop_albums/cov200/dre300/e355/e35513m2htv.jpg>

*PLEASE BE PREPARED FOR GRAPHIC IMAGES*




J: After discussing lynching and viewing the "Strange Fruit" video clip, what reactions do you have to lynching? What reactions do you have to the history of Jim Crow laws? What reaction do you have to "the South"? What reaction do you have to the fact that the Old Sarum mob came to exact their own punishment on Tom Robinson?




Friday, 4/2

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>HAND IN REFLECTION OF LANGSTON HUGHES'S POEM

<<Reading Quiz Chapter 16


>Chapters 16 VOCABULARY

>Then & Now Connection: justice issues

+Rodney King incident

+O.J. Simpson - a reversal of power and influence



Week 33 - April 5-9 - Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird


Monday, 4/5

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Reading Quiz Chapters 17-19


>Chapters 17-19 VOCABULARY

Begin watching 1962 film To Kill a Mockingbird



Tuesday, 4/6

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J: Ch. 20-21 - RAFT:

Role: Tom Robinson

Audience: Wife Helen

Format: private conversation in prison cell

Topic: What was going through your (Tom's) mind during the testimony of Bob and Mayella Ewell and Atticus's questioning of you.


>Chapters 20-21 VOCABULARY

>Trial Guide Review

>Then & Now Connection: trials and the court system

>RECORD FINAL PROJECT WITH MRS. HARTWIG ON THURSDAY<



Wednesday, 4/7 (early out)

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Reading Quiz Chapters 22-23


>CONSIDER YOUR FINAL PROJECT FOR To Kill A Mockingbird & RECORD TOMORROW<

>Chapters 22-23 VOCABULARY

>Continue watching film




Thursday, 4/8

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J: Ch. 24-25 - Why did Scout say, "Atticus had used every tool available to free men to save Tom Robinson, but in the secret courts of men's hearts Atticus had no case. Tom was a dead man the minute Mayella Ewell opened her mouth and screamed"? Justify your opinion.


>RECORD FINAL PROJECT WITH MRS. HARTWIG TODAY<


>Chapters 24-25 VOCABULARY

Jim Crow and Tom Robinson's Trial

>Continue watching film




Friday, 4/9

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Think of three interesting connections in each chapter that you read for today (chapters 26 & 27) and write them down in the form of a question (6 in all). Then turn your paper over, get out your book, locate the answer to those 6 questions, and write down the answer and its corresponding page number on the back of your paper.


>Chapters 26-27 VOCABULARY

>Then & Now Connection: The Psychology of Society

>A look through the psychoanalytical lens:

+Do you feel Harper Lee's text and narration infers she was sympathetic to the plight of African Americans?

+What types of relationships exist in the text

+Are there any inner conflicts within characters?

+How are these conflicts revealed?

+How are these conflicts dealt with?

+Are they ever resolved?

>We get a good idea of the inner conflicts and change in maturity within Scout since she is the narrator; however, what conflicts and changes does Jem encounter?

+In groups of twos or threes, read one of the following scenes and prepare a monologue by Jem to describe the inner conflict he is dealing with and his resolution:

++Chapter 7 (middle of 61 to 63) about Nathan Radley’s explanation of the tree

++Chapter 11 (middle of 110 to 112) about Atticus’s punishment of reading to Mrs. Dubose

++Chapter 14 (139 to 141) about Dill running away from home

++Chapter 26 (middle of 244 to 247) about Jem's reaction to Scout when she talks about Miss Gate's comments about Hitler




Week 34 - April 12-16 - Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird


Monday, 4/12

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Reading Quiz Chapters 28-29


>Hand in Project Rubric/Project Objectives to Mrs. Hartwig<

>Chapters 28-29 VOCABULARY



Tuesday, 4/13

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J: Ch. 30-31 - Reader Response Criticism: What is your emotional response to Harper Lee's work, specifically how she ends the story? What is your intellectual response to the work and its themes?


>Chapters 30-31 VOCABULARY

>Then & Now Connection: To look through the Feminist Lens, consider the following three main areas of study/points of criticism:

1. differences between men and women

++does the basic assumption that gender determines everything (including values and language) hold true in Lee's text?

++Do you feel there would be any differences in the topics or issues written about in this text had Lee been a man rather than a woman?

2. women in power or power relationships between men and women

++Do the women in this text have any power? If so, what type of power and over what does that power reign?

++What are the divisions of labor and economics between men and women in this text? 3. the female experience

++what aspects of feminine life are included in the work?

++contrast the traditional view that women are dependent on men for everything and analyze what situations and characters show male dependence on females.

>In small groups, read/scan one of the following chapters: 9, 13, 14, 23, and 29. Identify, discuss, and document comments made by Scout, Atticus, Jem, Calpurnia, and Aunt Alexandra that illustrate the role that Aunt Alexandra plays in Scout’s development as a Southern young lady. Each group will present its list and explanations to the class.



Wednesday, 4/14

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Get a symbolism worksheet and begin working quietly on completing it.



>A Look Through the New Critic's Lens: Exploring the symbolism of the mockingbird:

>After you have completed the CLOZE Activity from pages 90 and 241, answer the following questions: 1. Why do Atticus and Miss Maudie say it is a sin to kill a mockingbird?

2. How is Tom like a mockingbird?

3. Think of an example of a “mockingbird” from your own life or from other readings you have completed.

<Continue watching film


CONTINUE WATCHING FILM



Thursday, 4/15

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Get out your final project documents and resources to present.


>FINAL PROJECT DUE TOMORROW<

Complete viewing of film

FINAL PROJECT WORKSHOP



Friday, 4/16

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Get out your final project documents and resources to present.


>FINAL PROJECT DUE TODAY<

FINAL PROJECT WORKSHOP



Week 35 - April 19-23 - Sharing: sharing your final project, sharing in your community, sharing a celebration of Shakespeare


Monday, 4/19

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FINAL To Kill a Mockingbird PROJECT SHARING





Tuesday, 4/20

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FINAL To Kill a Mockingbird PROJECT SHARING





Wednesday, 4/21

raking-leaves.gifService Learning Day!!




Thursday, 4/22

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Shakespeare's Sonnet "S"elebration


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Friday, 4/23

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Happy Birthday, Shakespeare!

Shakespeare's Sonnet "S"elebration


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Week 36 - April 26-30 - Research Project


Monday, 4/26

bell.jpg Take a 1/4 sheet and write down as many issues or topics you can think of that you'd be interested in researching for your research project.


>Share Shakespearean Sonnets

>Review Research Project Goals

Discuss parts of first research project that you felt needed more explanation and assistance

Review Research Process

+Choose topic

+Organize thoughts/background knowledge

+Propose questions to answer in research

+Attempt Thesis

+Evaluate research needs

+Review research needs

+Begin research

>Research Process Walk-Through



Tuesday, 4/27

bell.jpgTake a 1/4 sheet and writer your name on it. Then, as we walk through the research process, write down the steps you will need to take when starting your research (opening Word, saving Works Cited, opening and saving Working Notes...). Before leaving class today, turn in your 1/4 sheet.


>Continue Research Process Walk-Through

+Make source cards with the information noted below or...

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...go right to the Works Cited (remember to save your Works Cited as soon as you start it).

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+Your working notes - either make note cards that indicate the source your information came from (top right corner), the topic or sub-point your information addresses (top left corner), and your information...

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...or simply type your notes in MS Word or write them in your notebook (remember to always include the source the information came from)...

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+What do I do with my notes? Begin the draft.

+Remember to correctly format in Times New Roman, 12 point, double-space right from the start. Also remember to start typing with your first page header as shown below. Then, once you get to the second page of typing...Sample_Research_Title_Page.png... ...format your second page header by simply double-clicking on the top margin, then making sure your font is set at Times New Roman, 12 point, then clicking the "different first page" icon, clicking alignment-right margin, typing your last name, space, and then clicking on the insert "#" sign (instead of typing in the page number). By completing these steps, Word will automatically insert your last name and correct page number for you, starting with your second page.

Sample_2nd_page_header.png

+What about those nasty in-text citations (parenthetical citations)? Once you type either information you have paraphrased from a source other than your own brain and creativity or a quote from some other source, you will need to cite that source. This is called a parenthetical citation.

>Paraphrased in-text citation example

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>Short direct quote in-text citation example (less than 4 lines)

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>Long direct quote in-text citation example (4 lines or longer)

MLA_long_web_quote_.png

>More of the research paper walk-through tomorrow.

>Now move to Media Center desktops and begin research.

>Turn in 1/4 sheets with your name on them.




Wednesday, 4/28

bell.jpgTake out research materials from yesterday and write down on a 1/4 sheet your game plan for today. What do you need to do step by step?

>Continue Research Process Walk-Through

+Review purpose of research paper project: the persuasive research

+Circle back to research & review of pre-writing

+Review notes

+Review pre-writing/outline/draft

+Review those nasty in-text citations (parenthetical citations)?

+Continue drafting/reviewing

+Peer Review

+Peer Edit

+Final Review & Edit

+Publishing

>Move to Media Center and continue research.



Thursday, 4/29

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>Continue Research & Begin Drafting



Friday, 4/30

bell.jpg>Working Notes or note cards DUE MONDAY AT BEGINNING OF CLASS<

>Continue Research/Drafting/Review



Week 37 - May 3-7 - Research Project


Monday, 5/3

bell.jpgGet out note cards or written notes (if you have them - if they are on the computer, print them out and hand them in once we get to the media center)

>Working Notes or note cards DUE TODAY<

>Continue Research Process Walk-Through

+Review purpose of research paper project: the persuasive research

+Circle back to research & review of pre-writing

+Review notes

+Review pre-writing/outline/organizational scheme/draft requirements (due Wednesday)

+Review those nasty in-text citations (parenthetical citations)?

+Continue drafting/reviewing

+Peer Review

+Peer Edit

+Final Review & Edit

+Publishing

>Continue Research/Drafting/Review



Tuesday, 5/4

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>Continue Research/Drafting/Review

>Pre-writing (outline/organization) DUE TOMORROW<



Wednesday, 5/5

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>Pre-writing (outline/organization) DUE TODAY<

>Continue Research/Drafting/Review



Thursday, 5/6

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>Continue Research/Drafting/Review



Friday, 5/7

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>ROUGH DRAFT DUE MONDAY FOR PEER REVIEWS<

>Continue Research/Drafting/Review



Week 38 - May 10-14 - Wrap-Up of Research Project... Beginning of John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men


Monday, 5/10

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  • After reviewing the purpose of peer editing, move to the media center where students will open their research papers on a computer & place a Peer Review Sheet next to their computer for peers to write their comments on.

  • Students will write their own name at the top of their sheet, leave it next to their computer, and move to a different computer to review a peer's essay.

  • They will each be responsible to review/edit at least three of their peers' essays.

  • During each review, students are to 1) stay positive and write a specific strength of the essay, 2) offer specific suggestions on wording, logic, organization, and content, and 3) note grammatical corrections they feel necessary in the essay.

  • They will then sign their name as the peer reviewer and then move to another peer's computer and essay.

  • Remember: no general cheerleading (you're awesome; looks great; wonderful); comments and suggestions must be specific and constructive.

WORKSHOP - musical chairs peer review

Watch for the following:

+Does the thesis set out the main points that are being discussed in the essay?

+Does each paragraph start with a topic sentence that indicates the topic or argument being addressed in that paragraph?

+Does the conclusion REVIEW the main points, not just RESTATE or list them? (e.g. Instead of restating like, "Given the facts of the job description, the benefits, and the education required, becoming an elementary teacher..." a solid conclusion will REVIEW or SUMMARIZE the information from the main points, such as, "Given the facts that elementary teachers are able to nurture and educate kids from kindergarten through 6th grade, are able to benefit from school-year employment, and are continually learning throughout their entire career, becoming an elementary teacher can...")

+Does the essay end with a reiteration of the thesis?

+Does the essay end with a strong statement? (e.g. a quote, an interesting statistic, a challenge, an inspiring comment)

>Revision Workshop tomorrow

>FINAL RESEARCH PAPERS DUE WEDNESDAY AT BEGINNING OF CLASS<



Tuesday, 5/11

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Take out your research documents and review your paper for the questions below.

>FINAL RESEARCH PAPERS DUE WEDNESDAY<

REVISION WORKSHOP - Now it is time to apply your peers' suggestions to your persuasive essay. Please review your rough draft your peers' suggestions and ask yourself the following, remembering that revision is the heart of the writing process:

+Does my thesis set out the main points I am discussing in my paper?

+Do I start out each paragraph with a topic sentence that indicates the question/topic I address in that paragraph?

+Does my conclusion REVIEW the main points, not just RESTATE or list them? (e.g. Instead of restating like, "Given the facts of the job description, the benefits, and the education required, becoming an elementary teacher..." a solid conclusion will REVIEW or SUMMARIZE the information from the main points, such as, "Given the facts that elementary teachers are able to nurture and educate kids from kindergarten through 6th grade, are able to benefit from school-year employment, and are continually learning throughout their entire career, becoming an elementary teacher can...")

+Do I reiterate my thesis at the end of my paper?

+Do I end my paper with a strong statement? (e.g. a quote, an interesting statistic, a challenge, an inspiring comment)



Wednesday, 5/12

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Get out research paper and pat yourself on the back!

>FINAL RESEARCH PAPERS DUE TODAY AT BEGINNING OF CLASS<

>RESEARCH PROJECT FINAL WRAP-UP

+On a 1/4 sheet, write down three specific bits of knowledge you learned about the research paper process. Be prepared to share.

>A Look at the 1930s, the Dust Bowl & the Migrant Worker


Thursday, 5/13

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Introduction to John Steinbeck

Introduction to the themes of Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men

Friday, 5/14

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Get an Of Mice and Men book and a reading guide and leaf through each to familiarize yourself with them.


Begin Read Aloud of Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men - Chapter 1

>Complete Chapter 1 Reading Guide during reading

>READ CHAPTER 2 FOR MONDAY (Complete Chapter 2 Reading Guide)




Week 39 - May 17-21 - John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men

Monday, 5/17

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Chapter 2 Quiz


Read Aloud of Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men - Chapter 3

+Mrs. Hartwig will begin the read aloud.

>Complete Chapter 3 Reading Guide


Tuesday, 5/18

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Review Chapter 3 Reading Guide


Complete read aloud of Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men - Chapter 3

>Complete Chapter 3 Reading Guide during reading

>READ CHAPTER 4 FOR TOMORROW (Complete Chapters 4 Reading Guide)


Wednesday, 5/19

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Chapter 3 Quiz


Complete read aloud of Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men - Chapter 5

>Complete Chapter 5 Reading Guide during reading

>READ CHAPTER 6 FOR TOMORROW (Complete Chapter 6 Reading Guide)

>Discuss Themes from Steinbeck's book.

+Mercy Killings

+Treatment of Mentally Handicapped People

+Objectification of Women

+Need for Friendship

+Loneliness

+The Search for the American Dream

+Class Conflict

+Weak vs. Strong

+Racism

>Pick one of the issues in Of Mice and Men that you have a solid opinion about. Identify that issue and compose a well-developed paragraph explaining your position on the issue. This paragraph will eventually become your position paper, which is the final grade you will receive for the Of Mice and Men unit. You will develop your paragraph on the issue you have chosen to write about and support your opinion using textual evidence (examples and situations from the book), as well as making real-life connections that support your opinion.

>Discourse Conventions to remember for Literary Position Paper:

  • You MUST refer to the name of the book, which is either underlined (when writing) or italicized (when typing).

  • When writing about literature, always write in present tense (Slim drowns four puppies because… NOT Slim drowned four puppies because…).

  • Use literary terms to discuss your points (i.e., character, theme, setting, rhyme, point of view, alliteration, symbols, imagery, figurative language, protagonist, and so forth).

  • Include a thesis statement that clearly sets forth your opinion about a meaningful theme of the literary work.

  • Include both an introduction that introduces the book and includes your thesis as well as a conclusion that reiterates your thesis.

  • Avoid summarizing the plot; instead, use examples that you explicitly connect to your opinion by showing how they support your opinion.

  • Support your opinion with many quotations and paraphrases, but write the majority of your paper in your own words with your own ideas.


Thursday, 5/20

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On a 1/4 sheet, write down the discourse conventions for your assigned position paper.

>Discuss Resolution of story

>Without reviewing your paragraph from yesterday, give it to a peer and have them read it silently. After your peer reads your paragraph, have them explain your chosen issue and your opinion verbally. Then discuss any differences between what they explained verbally and your written explanation and meaning. Also spend time reviewing and discussing the content and support you have included for your opinion. Consider any dissonance and make necessary changes to your paragraph, adding more content and more examples (textual and real-life) that build justification for your opinion. Then hand in.

>Begin watching film


Friday, 5/21

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>>THIS IS A SILENT ACTIVITY<<

Exchange your paper about an issue presented in Of Mice and Men and identify your peer's issue and his/her stance and justification (reasoning) on that issue in a one to two-sentence summary. You will review and evaluate a total of three peers' papers. Hand in each evaluation.

Drafting Workshop

1. Mrs. Hartwig will give you your paper and your peers' three evaluations. Review the evaluations, consider any dissonance between your intended message and your peers' understandings, and then revise your original paper accordingly and hand in.

2. Mrs. Hartwig will then give you three of your peers' papers (one at a time). Read each peer’s paper and evaluate his or her examples and justifications. Are there enough examples (at least 3)? Are they explicitly connected in a way that supports their opinion? Do they make sense?

3. Mrs. Hartwig will return to you your peers' three evaluations and your paper. Review the evaluations, consider any dissonance between your justifications and your peers' understanding. Think through these areas that need clarification. Then revise accordingly in order to further develop your position paper. Hand in.

>Continue watching film




Week 40 - May 24-27 - John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men Writing Lab

Monday 5/24

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Pick up a Position Paper Rubric and review your Of Mice and Men position paper for clarity.

Drafting Workshop

1. Mrs. Hartwig will give you three of your peers' papers (one at a time). Read your peer’s papers and question and make suggestions regarding the organization and clarity of the paragraph. Is the organization of your peer's paper strong? Does the introduction introduce the book? Does the introduction introduce the theme/issue? Is there an obvious thesis/position statement? Does the textual evidence flow logically or jump around? Is there enough textual support? Is there an introduction, body of support, and a conclusion that reiterates their opinion? Remember: you are helping your peers strengthen their papers, just like your peers are helping YOU, so offer productive and constructive suggestions. Hand in each evaluation.

2. Mrs Hartwig will give you your peers' three suggestions and your paper. Review the suggestions, and consider any apparent dissonance between your intended message and your peers' understandings and reception of your message. Then revise your paper and hand in.

>Continue watching film


Tuesday 5/25

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Review your Of Mice and Men position paper for clarity.

>Of Mice and Men Study Guide Due TODAY<

Revising Workshop

1 Mrs. Hartwig will hand you three of your peers' papers (one at a time) for the LAST TIME. This time, EDIT your peers' papers for conventions and hand in.

3. Mrs. Hartwig will give you your peers' evaluations and your own paper for the LAST TIME in order for you to review the edit suggestions, consider any corrections that need to occur, neatly rewrite, and then hand in.

YOUR POSITION PAPER IS NOW DONE! Good Job!!!

<CHECK WITH MRS. HARTWIG ON YOUR GRADE!!!

>Continue watching film



Wednesday 5/26

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Semester Test:

Critical theories of literary criticism, grammar & research paper rules, literary themes and details in our readings, and critical thinking



sunshine.jpgHave a SENSATIONAL SUMMER!! sunshine.jpg